Hand fasting Ceremony 3

Hand-fasting-Ceremony-3

Hand-fasting-Ceremony-3

To begin:

REV: You have been invited today to witness an echo of creation. Hear well, see all, and remember for all time. You shall carry this promise back to the world that it may be given force before man and spirit. Blessed welcome!

Start the chosen music for the ceremony.

Attendant Procession

Rev hands unlit taper to primary female attendant (Maid or Matron of Honour).

REV: Be Blessed and well come to this place. Be free from care and healed of harm while you sojourn here.

Rev hands unlit taper to primary male attendant (Best Man).

REV: Be Blessed and well come to this place. Be free from care and healed of harm while you sojourn here.

Start chosen music once more

Bride and Groom walk down aisle together, holding hands followed by a child carrying hanging incense burner.

REV: Be Blessed and well come to this place. Be free from care and healed of harm while you sojourn here. Well come all, and thrice blessed this place and time that see’s two travellers find a common road.

REV: In the endless dark of the unborn world there came two flames becoming one fire. Let Their flames burn in your hearts to bring light and warmth to the night of your soul

Bride and Groom shall light their tapers from the respective altar candles

REV: As travellers do we set forth into the forest of life. We are called into its reaches by the promise that there we will find peace and completion. With no map to guide us we wander blindly, sometimes aimlessly, with intuition and faith alone to serve as signposts. Travelers are we all.
We proceed from birth to death. From birth to death till some hidden time when we have gained understanding to choose otherwise. With only instinct to guide us we are cast at the edge of the forest by our birth. We may withdraw in fear seeking company at the massed fires of those that prefer the known empty plains to the dark and wild wood. Or we may wander aimlessly spending
life for naught. We may journey forward into it following our native sense.

Occasionally are we given to meet others, also tracking the wild paths. In their company do we find a moments pleasure…company and conversation. In time our paths diverge and they are called to their way and we to ours. Once again, do we move forward alone towards the distant call so faintly
heard…the far-off vision so dimly seen. But chance may find that upon the passing of a stranger we find our ways the same and the company a pleasure.
If fate is kind we may find company to join us upon our way. The journey shared. __Bride’s Name__ and __Groom’s Name__ have found each other in the dark reaches of the wild wood. Through each other’s eyes do both see their vision more clearly, with each other’s ears do they hear the call more plainly.

REV: You have been invited today to witness an echo of creation. Hear well, see all, and remember for all time. You shall carry this promise back to the world that it may be given force before man and spirit. Blessed welcome!

Start chosen music once again

Attendant Procession

Rev hands unlit taper to primary female attendant (Maid or Matron of Honour).

REV: Be Blessed and well come to this place. Be free from care and healed of harm while you sojourn here.

Rev hands unlit taper to primary male attendant (Best Man).

REV: Be Blessed and well come to this place. Be free from care and healed of harm while you sojourn here.

Start chosen music once again

Bride and Groom walk down aisle together, holding hands followed by a child carrying hanging incense burner.

REV: Be Blessed and well come to this place. Be free from care and healed of harm while you sojourn here. Well come all, and thrice blessed this place and time that see’s two travellers find a common road.

REV: In the endless dark of the unborn world there came two flames becoming one fire. Let Their flames burn in your hearts to bring light and warmth to the night of your soul

Bride and Groom shall light their tapers from the respective altar candles

REV: As travellers do we set forth into the forest of life. We are called into its reaches by the promise that there we will find peace and completion. With no map to guide us we wander blindly, sometimes aimlessly, with intuition and faith alone to serve as signposts. Travelers are we all.
We proceed from birth to death. From birth to death till some hidden time when we have gained understanding to choose otherwise. With only instinct to guide us we are cast at the edge of the forest by our birth. We may withdraw in fear seeking company at the massed fires of those that prefer the known empty plains to the dark and wild wood. Or we may wander aimlessly spending life for naught. We may journey forward into it following our native sense.
Occasionally are we given to meet others, also tracking the wild paths. In their company do we find a moments pleasure…company and conversation. In time our paths diverge and they are called to their way and we to ours. Once again, do we move forward alone towards the distant call so faintly heard…the far-off vision so dimly seen. But chance may find that upon the passing of a stranger we find our ways the same and the company a pleasure.
If fate is kind we may find company to join us upon our way. The journey shared. __Bride’s Name__ and __Groom’s Name__ have found each other in the dark reaches of the wild wood. Through each other’s eyes do both see their vision more clearly, with each other’s ears do they hear the call more plainly, and in each others arms do they find greater strength than either alone possesses. For as far as they can see their path is one…so too have they elected to be one.

REV: Let the fires within you intertwine and become a single source of light upon your path.

Bride and Groom light the unity candle

REV: They will now allow their hearts to speak.

Bride and Groom turn to each other

GROOM: __Bride’s Name__ you have embraced all aspects of my nature. You love me completely, for both my strengths and my weaknesses. You have given me the courage and faith to trust you, to let you love me as an entire person. You have allowed me to embrace all aspects of your nature. You have let me love you completely, for both your strengths and your weaknesses. You have shown courage and faith in me, to trust me to love you as an entire person. I, __Groom’s Name__, with the knowledge and experience of the life we’ve lived together choose to take you once again, __Bride’s Name__, just as you are, and however you may change, above all others, to share my life.”

BRIDE: __Groom’s Name__ you have embraced all aspects of my nature. You love me completely, for both my strengths and my weaknesses.
You have given me the courage and faith to trust you, to let you love me as an entire person. You have allowed me to embrace all aspects of your nature.
You have let me love you completely, for both your strengths and your weaknesses.
You have shown courage and faith in me, to trust me to love you as an entire person.
I, __Bride’s Name__, with the knowledge and experience of the life we’ve lived together choose to take you once again, __Groom’s Name__, just as you are, and however you may change, above all others, to share my life.”

GROOM:(Takes cup from altar & kneels) With this cup, I promise to accept the love you pour upon me, and to return that love in kind. (Bride takes pitcher and fills cup)
BRIDE: Drink, then, of my love. (Groom drinks, places cup on table, and rises, Bride takes up her cup and kneels)
BRIDE: With this cup, I promise to accept the love you pour upon me, and to return that love in kind. (Groom takes pitcher and fills cup)
GROOM: Drink, then, of my love. (Bride drinks, places cup on table, and stands)

GROOM: With my breath I ask our God/Goddess to bless this union. (Takes cup from table and speaks over it) With this drink I rebind my life to yours. (Groom holds cup up, Bride places her hands over his)
BRIDE: I drink of our life together. (Bride drinks, Groom places cup on table and stands. “With this cup I ask our God/Goddess (or both if you prefer) to bless this union. (Takes cup from table and speaks over it) With this drink I rebind my life to yours. (Bride holds cup up, Groom places his hands over hers)
GROOM: I drink of our life together. (Groom drinks, Bride returns cup to the
table)

Bride and Groom place hands on altar, Rev binds with silken cord

REV: May your spirits be bound, your minds be common, and your bodies be one that none may come between you so long as your path is shared.

REV: Behold, the renewed, going forth as one. May their path be clear and easy beneath their feet. Go forth and celebrate.

Play music of choice to end ceremony.


Thought-for-the-day

Thought for the day

 

Gardeners and farmers express their detestation of earth worms, and yet even worms have a mission which gardeners and farmers fail to comprehend.


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The love of the forest

The-love-of-the-forest

 

The-love-of-the-forest
Thoughts of our planet

One of many aspects of being a wiccan is the love for our natural world and I can honestly say that my spiritual path has been enriched by nature.

A woodland ramble is an enjoyable recreation at all periods of the year. There is a beauty and a charm which is peculiar to each season, and something new may be learnt at all times. It is comparatively easy, for instance, to determine every tree in summer and autumn when there are leaves to guide us, but in the winter new aspects are encountered, and then it becomes a good exercise to determine trees by their aspect, habit of growth, ramification, angular incidence of the branches appearance of the bark; and thus, as it were, determine its name from its skeleton.

In the spring, another exercise awaits us; it is the determination of trees from the form and arrangement of the young buds. Some are opposite to each other, some are alternate, some are much elongated, others are short and obtuse. A little study and practice will soon enable anyone to determine one twig from another, and refer each to its proper tree. The arrangement of the buds around a twig follows in each species a uniform plan. If we take a beech twig, for instance, we shall observe that the buds are produced in two opposite rows, so that they occur alternately on opposite sides of the twig. The first, third, and fifth being over each other on one side, and the second, fourth, and sixth on the other. If we draw a line from any given bud spirally round the twig, so as to pass through three consecutive buds, we shall find when it has reached the third bud it is directly over the point whence it started, has made one turn of a spiral passed from one bud, through a second, and ended at the third. This is a simple arrangement of alternate buds.

Let us take the alder, and starting in the same manner from a given bud, draw a line spirally through all the buds above it until the line terminates at a bud directly over that from which the spiral started. In this instance, the fourth bud will be over the first, and the spiral has made one revolution. Now, examine an oak twig in the same manner, and the sixth bud will be found directly over the first; but to reach this the spiral will make two revolutions instead of one; no bud within one revolution of a spiral occurring just over the starting point. In the same manner, a willow twig being examined, it will be seen that the spiral
makes three convolutions before a bud is reached which is directly over the first, and the number of buds included in the series is eight. Such an exercise will give zest to a winter or early spring walk in a wood, and at the same time become a source of instruction.

In order to facilitate the recording of such observations a fractional method is adopted. The number of convolutions of the spiral representing the numerator, the number of buds encountered being the denominator. Thus, the beech is J, the alder J, the oak, the willow f and c. The ash and horse chestnut, and some other trees, have the buds in pairs opposite to each other, and the arrangement is commonly that of the simple alternation of pairs. As a matter of course the leaves of the same trees will follow the same plan, and may be studied in the same manner.

Although it is difficult to find two leaves on the same tree so exactly alike that they cannot be distinguished from each other, yet the general outline, or contour, will always be found to follow a particular type, the veins will diverge at a given angle, and fallen leaves may, without any great difficulty, be referred, after a little practice, to the kind of tree to which they belong. This exercise will also furnish young persons with occupation during a winter walk, and one which may afterwards prove of considerable service should their tastes lead them to the study of the parasites of leaves.

A curious theory was once propounded, that the primary veins of a given leaf diverge from the mid-rib at the same angle as the branches of the parent tree diverge from the stem. That in all trees there is a coincidence of angle at which the primary veins, branches, and roots diverge. This was probably more fanciful than true, since the incidence is not often uniform in the same tree.

We do not doubt that all persons, but especially those who habitually reside in towns, enjoy an occasional ramble through the woods; without any specific object beyond the enjoyment of its scenery, its atmosphere, or its music, such an occasional ramble will afford pleasure; but, if we add to this inducement something which shall call forth the powers of obser vation, how much more enjoyable the ramble becomes. It matters little what the particular object may be which leads a person habitually to take a woodland ramble, so long as it is something which leads him to use his eyes, keeps his mental faculties in exercise, and furnishes some material for afterthought. A simple walk through a wood or a green lane, as an expedient for killing time, must always prove unsatisfactory, and yet the feat is accomplished every day. Let those who would really and thoroughly enjoy a woodland stroll undertake it with some definite object, and they will find, not only that the time passes too rapidly away, but that weariness comes less speedily; and the subsequent reflections will, in a measure, repeat the enjoyment when the stroll cannot be repeated. One person will go through a wood who has a great love for birds; he will watch all their movements, study their notes, observe their habits, and return home on every occasion with some new experience, some pleasant reminiscence of his stroll.

THE vegetation of woodlands may, for the sake of convenience, be arranged in four groups. The first group would consist of the large timber trees which constitute the wood or forest. These, in some instances, are chiefly of one or two kinds, as oak woods, beech woods, or fir woods; but in the majority of cases they are much more mixed, and consist of several species growing together. The second group consists of smaller trees which compose the undergrowth, and shrubs which never attain the dignity of trees. The third group will be the herbaceous vegetation, mixed with dwarf perennials. Whilst the fourth group will include what are botanically called cryptogams, such as the ferns, mosses, liver worts, lichens, and fungi. It will be advisable to treat of this vegetation under these four groups, giving examples of each, without attempting to enumerate all; and as the arrangement is purely an artificial one, at least in so far as the first three groups are concerned, it must not be subjected to too critical a test.

Much might have been written of the uses to which each kind of timber has been applied, the economic application of the bark and other portions, the trees of each species remarkable for their size, age, or historical associations.

The Oak is the mightiest trees and is common in all our woodlands and parks. Some persons are of opinion that what we term the ” oak ” consists of two species, others that these are only well marked varieties. -The distinctions are that in the pedunculate form the leaves have very short footstalks, and the stalks of the fruits are much elongated. The buds on the young wood are not prominent. In the sessile-fruited form the leaves have long footstalks, the fruit is seated close to the branch, and the buds on the young wood are prominent. What, however, is of still greater importance is, that the timber of the sessile -fruited form is very greatly inferior to that produced by the stalked-fruited or pedunculate form.

In the days of wooden ships our “three-deckers” were built of oak; and a curious calculation is made in Brown’s “Forester” as to the quantity of oak
which was requisite to construct a first-class ” man-of- war.” “It takes fully one hundred and fifty thousand cubic feet of timber to build a seventy-four-gun ship; and allowing upon an average that the trees in an oak forest, when arrived at maturity and ready for ship building, stood at the distance of about thirty feet from each other, we could only have about fifty trees from an acre; and supposing that the same trees were from one hundred to one hundred and twenty years old, there would probably be about seventy feet of timber in each at an average : consequently, we see from this calculation, which is pretty near the truth, that no less than the matured crop of forty-four acres of woodland, or two thousand two hundred full grown trees, are required for one such ship.” This relates, however, to the past, as iron and steel have superseded wood in naval construction.

It is pleasing to know that of this modern age the forestry commitions though out the world replant new young trees to replace the fallen.


 

Thought-for-the-day

Thought for the day

 

The great unknown is not, however, man himself alone and apart from all but, rather, midst all, in relation with all: man in relation with the all, with the infinite all of the universe.


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Witch Gothandra – Visions

Witch Gothandra – Visions

Witch Gothandra – Visions

The favourite season of visions is night–mainly the hour about midnight–and in the whole year, the time of Advent, but also the nights from Christmas to New Year.

 

Witch Gothandra – Visions

This is, of course, not a feature of supernatural life, but the simple effect of the greater quiet and the more thoughtful, inward life, which these seasons are apt to bring to busy men.

The reality of our surroundings disappears with the setting sun, and in deep night we are rendered almost wholly independent of the influence exercised in the day by friends, family, and even furniture.

All standards of measurement, moreover, disappear, and we lose the correct estimate of both space and time. Turning our thoughts at such times with greater energy and perseverance inward, our imagination has free scope, and countless images appear before our mind’s eye which are not subject to the laws of real life. Darkness, stillness, and solitude, the three great features of midnight seasons, all favour the full activity of our fancy, and set criticism at defiance by denying us all means of comparison with real sounds or sights. At the same time, it is asserted, that under such circumstances men are also better qualified to perceive manifestations which, during the _turba_ of daily life, are carelessly ignored or really imperceptible to the common senses.
So long as the intercourse with the world and its exigencies occupy all our thoughts, and self-interest makes us look fixedly only at someone great purpose of life, we are deaf and blind to all that does not clearly belong to this world. But when these demands are no longer made upon us, and especially when, as in the time of Advent, our thoughts are somewhat drawn from earthly natures, and our eyes are lifted heavenward, then we are enabled to give free scope to our instincts, or, if we prefer the real name, to the additional sense by which we perceive intangible things.

A comparison has often been drawn between the ability to see visions and our power to distinguish the stars.

In the day, the brilliancy of the sun so far outshines the latter, that we see not a single one; at night they step forth, as it were, from the dark, and the deeper the blackness of the sky, the greater their own brightness. Are they, on that account, nothing more than creatures of our imagination, set free by night and darkness? As for the favourite places where visions most frequently are seen, it seems that solitudes have already in ancient times always been looked upon as special resorts for evil spirits.
Well-authenticated cases of visions are recorded in unbroken succession from the times of antiquity to our own day, and leave no doubt on the mind that they are not only of common occurrence among men, but generally, also, accompanied by magic phenomena of great importance.
The ancients saw, of course, most frequently their gods; the pagans, who had been converted to Christianity, their former idols threatening them with dire punishment; and Christians, their saints and martyrs, their angels and demons. Thus all parties are supported by authorities in no way peculiar to one faith or another, but common to all humanity; and the battle is fought, for a time at least, between faith and faith, and between vision and vision.

A peculiarly interesting class of visions are those to which great artists have, at times, owed their greatest triumphs. Here, also, the line between mere delusion and real magic phenomena is often so faint as to escape attention. For artists must needs cultivate their imagination at the expense of other faculties, and naturally live more in an ideal world than in a real world. Preoccupied as they are, by the nature of their pursuits, with images of more than earthly beauty, they come easily to form ideals in their minds, which they endeavour to fix first upon their memory, and then upon canvas or in marble, on paper or in rapturous words.

The important part which visions hold in the history of the various religions of the earth lies beyond our present purpose; we know, however, that the records of ancient temples, of prophets, saints, and martyrs, and of later convents and churches, abound with instances of such so-called revelations from on high. They have more than once served at critical times to excite individuals and whole nations to make sublime efforts.

It is not exactly a magic phenomenon, but certainly a most startling feature in visions, that the minds of many men should be able, by their own volition, to create images and forms so perfectly like those existing in the world around us, that the same minds are incapable of distinguishing where hallucination and reality touch each other. This faculty varies, of course, as much as other endowments: sometimes it produces nothing but vague, shapeless lights or sounds; in other persons it is capable of calling up well-defined forms, and of causing even words to be heard and pain to be inflicted.

During severe suffering in body or soul, it may become a comforter, and in the moment of passing through the valley of the shadow of death, it is apt to soothe the anguish, by visions of heavenly bliss, but to an evil conscience it may also appear as an avenger, by prefiguring impending judgment and condemnation. It is this influence on the lives of men, and their great moral importance, which lends to visions–and in a certain degree even to hallucinations–additional interest, and makes it our duty not to set them aside as mere idle phantoms, but to try to ascertain their true nature and final purpose. This is all the more necessary, as in our day visions are considered purely the offspring of the seer’s own mental activity, a truth abundantly proven by the simple fact that blind or deaf people are quite as capable of having visions and hallucinations, as those who have the use of all their senses.

Thus these magic phenomena have, in an unbroken chain, accompanied almost all the great men who are known to history, from the earliest time to our own day. In modern times they have often been successfully traced to bodily and mental disorders; but this fact diminishes in no way the interest which they have for the student of magic.

A numerous class of visions, presenting some of the most interesting phenomena of this branch of magic, must be looked upon as the result of the innate desire to fathom the mystery of future life. The human heart, conscious of immortality by nature and assured of it by revelation, desires ardently to lift the veil which conceals the secrets of the life to come. Among other means to accomplish this, the promise has often been exacted of dear friends, that they would, after death, return and make known their condition in the other world. Such compacts have been made from time immemorial–but so far their only result has been that the survivors have believed occasionally that they have received visits from deceased friends–in other words, that their state of great excitement and eager expectation has caused them to have visions. It remains true, after all, that from that borne no traveller ever returns.

Nevertheless, these visions have a deep interest for the psychologist, as they are the result of unconscious action, and thus display what thoughts dwell in our innermost heart concerning the future.


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Witch Dalorice – Revolting Practices

Witch Dalorice

Witch Dalorice

Confidence in infectious enchantment leads legitimately to different revolting practices.

 

Witch Dalorice – Revolting Practices

In Torres Straits, the sweat of eminent warriors was intoxicated by young fellows, who additionally ate blended with their sustenance the scrapings from the finger-nails of the warriors which had turned out to be immersed with human blood all together to make solid and like a stone.

The eyes and tongue of a naturally executed foe were every now and again detached and given to chaps to make them overcome and bold. The Australian locals trust that a man’s fat and his quality and essentialness are associated, subsequently the squandering of the body and illness are the consequence of the nonattendance of fat, maybe to be trailed by death. By catapulting a man’s fat and therefore making it a player in himself, the kindred believes that he likewise gains the quality of the perished. So likewise, they imagine that human fat acquires achievement chasing, causes lances which orientated with it to fly genuine, or the club to strike powerful blows. The ownership of human fat is, along these lines, abundantly fancied by these natives, particularly the individuals who feel age or malady, or who wish to be effective in the enchanted expressions, for it is trusted that the soul of the dead keeps an eye on fat has been utilized will help the appeal to act. Savagery for otherworldly reasons for this sort has most likely been to a great degree normal and is conceivably at the base of a decent arrangement of anthropophagy.
Widely spread is the conviction that close relatives or even companions are bound together in a thoughtful connection, which is particularly manifest on essential events or at basic circumstances.

At the point when a Land Dayak village has turned out for a wild-pig chase in the wilderness, the individuals who stay at home may not touch water or oil with their hands amid the nonattendance of their companions, for fear that the seekers ought to all progress toward becoming ” spread fingered.’ and the prey so escape them. It is likewise recorded from Borneo that when men are on a war undertaking, flames are lit at home, the mats are spread, and the flames kept up till late at night and lit again before day break, so that the men may not be icy; the material of the house is opened before first light, so that the men may not lie too long thus fall into the adversaries’ hands. Again, when a Dayak is out head-chasing, his significant other, or, if he is unmarried, his sister, must wear a sword day and night, all together that he may be continually thinking about his weapons; and she may not rest amid the day nor go to bed before two in the morning, keeping in mind that her better half or sibling ought to in this way be astounded in his rest by a foe.

Comparable occasions could without much of a stretch be duplicated indefinitely from different nations, however even in Europe there are not lacking records of a genuine sensitivity amongst a couple, where the previous experiences certain trademark infirmities of the last. There is a generally spread arrangement of traditions based upon the conviction that the father and his unborn or recently conceived tyke are in such thoughtful relationship that the previous needs to take a wide range of precautionary measures keeping in mind that his posterity ought to in any capacity be harmed. The outrageous frame this custom takes is for the recently made father to take to his informal lodging extraordinarily counted calories; this happens in many spots, yet outstandingly in the East Indian Archipelago and in South America.

The custom, which is known as the Couvade is liable to numerous alterations. Among the Land Dayaks of Borneo the spouse of a pregnant lady, until the season of her conveyance, may not do work with any sharp instrument, aside from what might be totally fundamental for the development of his homestead; he may not entwine things with rattans, or strike creatures, or discharge firearms, or do anything of a savage character inspired by a paranoid fear of harming the tyke.

Regularly the men must swear off certain sustenance keeping in mind that it ought to influence the youngster; along these lines in Guiana sharing of the Agouti would make the tyke small, or eating a labium would make the new-born child’s mouth protonate Uke the labia’s, or make it spotted like the labia, which spots would at last move toward becoming ulcers. Subsequently the father is often suspended from performing a large portion of the typically unconsidered every day demonstrations, keeping in mind that they ought to influence the welfare of a youngster that is recently conceived or is going to be conceived; and there is the inquisitive advancement of the conviction of a mysterious response of the normal tyke on the fattier, affecting, to take one case, his achievement in Using.
At the point when man initially started to consider his general surroundings he more likely than not noted (what he, in the same way as different creatures, had unwittingly followed up on before) that day and night and the seasons landed in normal progression, similar stars rose and set, a creature re-delivered its own kind, in certainty that there was a consistency in nature. Be that as it may, next to each other with the regular arrangements there were anomalies.
Some days were shorter than others, some were brilliant, others overcast, the length and character of the seasons differed from year to year, a few stars had a course in the sky free of the ‘larger part. Once more, he may early have seen that large portions of these vacillations in daylight and rain, in warmth and cool, influenced him straightforwardly or in a roundabout way by enhancing vegetation.

We need not be surprised, therefore, if he concluded that it would be better for him if he exerted himself to regulate matters somewhat, but then the difficulty would arise, what was he to do?


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Blessing For A Lammas Feast

blessing for a lammas feast

blessing for a lammas feast

Blessing For A Lammas Feast is most beautiful

Not too long ago I attended a blessing for a Lammas feast and it was to say one of the most enjoyable times I have had for a long time.

Now is the Time if the First Harvest, when the bounties of Nature give of themselves so that we may survive O God of the ripening fields.

Blessing For A Lammas Feast

Lord of the Grain, grant me the understanding of sacrifice as you prepare to deliver yourself under the sickle of the Goddess and journey to the lands of eternal summer o Goddess of the Dark Moon.  

Teach me the secrets of rebirth as the Sun loses its strength and the nights grow cold.

(Crumble grains of wheat and let them fall on your altar or table. Take a bite of the ritual fruit and continue).

I partake of the first harvest, mixing its energies with mine that I may continue my quest for the starry wisdom of perfection O Lady of the Moon and Lord of the Sun, before whom the stars halt their courses, I offer my thanks for the continuing fertility of the Earth. May the nodding grain loose its seeds to be buried in the Mother’s breast ensuring rebirth in the warmth of next spring.

(Consume the rest of the ritual fruit)

It is appropriate to plant the seeds from the fruit consumed in ritual. If they sprout and grow the plant with love and as a symbol of your connection with the Goddess and God.

Blessing For A Lammas Feast

              Lammas Poem

The Corn King gives his life for the land;
we toast his sacrifice with Ale in our hand
and eat the bread from the harvest made
As sheaves of corn to the earth are laid.
Transformation surrounds us
the harvest turned to food and drink
now is the time to learn and think
of what we can do to grow even stronger
As the summer recedes and the nights grow longer.
We share our rewards and bless the earth
that brings our fruitful abundance to birth
may our well-earned bounty reward our toil
as we harvest the seed and the grain from the soil.


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